Tag: twitter

PARC ARES Now Has A Twitter Account

The Panhandle Amateur Radio Club’s Amateur Radio Emergency Service group (PARC ARES) now has a Twitter account, @PanhandleARES, as an extension of the www.PanhandleARES.org website. There is no cost to the PARC for this account, and it will be maintained by KE5ZRT. The Twitter account will allow us to communicate more easily with the surrounding ARES groups in the region. We will also be able to receive and forward information from local, regional and national emergency services groups such as FEMA, TxDOT, Red Cross, local and national media, NWS personnel and more.  Further, @PanhandleARES will facilitate another avenue of dissemination of information. Please follow @PanhandleARES for news of local events related to the PARC, PARC ARES, and pertinent local emergency information.

If you are new to Twitter, or you are unfamiliar with Twitter, please check the following link for more information: http://twitter.com/about


WTX Hams Use Twitter EchoLink and RF for Health and Welfare Traffic During WTX Wildfires

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During the wildfires at Midland and Ft. Myers on April 9th, KE5MKT of Midland became aware of individuals, via local repeater traffic, who were trying to locate family members who had possibly been evacuated. After exhausting other means of obtaining information, and while preparing to evacuate his own home, KE5MKT posted an urgent request for information related to the evacuations on his Twitter account. KE5ZRT and KE5ZRU of Amarillo were monitoring the newly created Twitter account representing the PARC ARES group, @PanhandleARES, and responded to the request for information by calling the Sherriff’s departments at nearby Fort Stockton, Alpine and Balmorhea. It was determined that 300 residents had been evacuated from Fort Myers to the Red Cross shelter at Balmorhea. KE5ZRU relayed this information via EchoLink to KE5MKT who was then able to share this information via RF and Twitter to locals that needed the information. Throughout the night, KE5MKT continued to pass health and welfare traffic utilizing both Twitter and amateur radio. Additionally, the Big Bend Emergency net was initiated on 3.922 to aid in communication efforts.


Storm Reports via Twitter

 You can now submit your significant weather observations to the National Weather Service (NWS) via Twitter.

Everyone talks about the weather.  Now’s your chance to “tweet” it and be heard.  Through an experimental program, the National Weather Service will be searching for tweets that contain significant weather information.

Why Twitter?

An advantage of searching Twitter for weather reports is the capability to utilize recently added “geotagging” — geographical information that is associated with something, in this case individual Tweets.  This allows the NWS to correlate each Tweet to its location when it was sent.  This capability will help to enhance and increase timely and accurate online weather reporting and communication between the public and their local weather forecast offices.  The reports will be carefully evaluated during the experiment to ensure quality and timeliness.

Who Can Participate?

Anyone with a Twitter account can participate.  Note: Trained storm spotters should use pre-established communication methods (Amateur Radio, toll-free line, eSpotter, etc.), when possible, to send severe weather reports to the NWS–although Twitter reports (photos) may be useful in addition to pre-established methods.

Here’s What You Need to Do:

If Geotagging is available on your 3rd party Twitter application:

  1. Make sure geotagging is turned on for your 3rd party Twitter app.
  2. Make sure geotagging is turned on for your Twitter account page.
  3. Submit your Tweet report via your 3rd party app in the following format:
    #wxreport your significant weather report

Some examples of weather report tweets with geotagging:

Ex. 1:   #wxreport 6.0″ of new snow as of 1 pm
Ex. 2:   #wxreport Hail 3/4 inch in diameter at 4:25 pm

If Geotagging is NOT available on your 3rd party Twitter application (or you want to use the web-based Twitter.com):

  1. Log into your Twitter account via the web or mobile device.
  2. Submit your tweet report in the following format:
    #wxreport  WW  your location WW  your significant weather report
  3. Your location can be just about anything, but the more specific the better.  Here are some examples listed from most accurate to least accurate location identification:
    • Most accurate–A latitude and longitude:
      WW 44.231, -88.485 WW
    • An address:
      WW 2485 S Point Rd, Green Bay, WI 54313 WW
    • A street intersection:
      WW intersection of Holly St and N 4th St, Perry, OK WW
    • A city name:
      WW Ft Lauderdale, FL WW
    • Least accurate–A zip code:
      WW 53221 WW

Some examples of weather report tweets without geotagging:

Ex. 1:   #wxreport WW 1289 W Oakridge Circle, St Louis, MO WW 6.0″ new snow as of 1 pm
Ex. 2:   #wxreport WW 44.115, -88.595 WW Hail 3/4 inch in diameter at 4:25 pm

What You Can Report

You can tweet any weather event that occurs in your local area, but we are most interested in significant events: snowfall, severe weather, flooding, etc.  In particular:

  • Damage from winds–briefly describe what was damaged and time it occurred.
  • Hail–include size of hail and time it fell.
  • Tornadoes or funnel clouds.
  • Flooding–briefly describe what is occurring.
  • Snowfall during an event and storm total.  When reporting snowfall, include the time period when it fell.
  • Freezing rain or freezing drizzle producing a ‘glaze’ on objects or roads.
  • Dense fog restricting visibility to less than a half mile.

Additional Guidance

Frequently Asked Questions

  • The purpose of this project is to allow people to submit reports.  Please be responsible and respectful of the purpose.
  • Be as specific as possible when describing the weather report.
  • A valid Twitter user account is required to submit reports.  As such, use of this service constitutes an agreement to the terms of service of the provider. Go to: http://twitter.com/tos for more information
  • Interested in displaying tweets from the project on your own web page? The files you need are contained here (zip). See the “readme.txt” file included for more information.

Monitoring Your Reports

The following external (non-NWS) links will monitor #wxreport tweets (click the links below):

Note: Some #wxreport monitoring websites that plot the weather report on a map may not properly plot tweets that use the “WW” location tag.

If you have any questions or suggestions for the program, please contact Corey Pieper — corey.pieper@noaa.gov


Welcome to EchoLink

EchoLink® software allows licensed Amateur Radio stations to communicate with one another over the Internet, using streaming-audio technology. The program allows worldwide connections to be made between stations, or from computer to station, greatly enhancing Amateur Radio’s communications capabilities. There are more than 200,000 validated users worldwide — in 162 of the world’s 193 nations — with about 5,000 online at any given time.

The program runs on Microsoft Windows®.  It is offered free of charge and may be downloaded here .

What is EchoLink for Android?

EchoLink for Android is an edition of the EchoLink software that runs on an Android smartphone or tablet, such as a Motorola Droid or an HTC Evo. If you own one of these devices and are a validated EchoLink user, you can access the EchoLink system from nearly anywhere where WiFi or 3G networking is available. EchoLink for Android is available free of charge from the Android Market; tap the Market icon on your phone and search for EchoLink. Or, if you have a bar code scanner app on your Android phone, scan the QR code that appears to the right.

Once you have downloaded the free software, all you need is an internet connection and a microphone headset and you can talk to hams worldwide. Alternatively, you can access EchoLink via RF without a computer from your handy-talkie, base or mobile station. Locally, in Amarillo the KC5EZO repeater (444.050, PL 88.5, node #307304) is tied in to EchoLink. Additionally, in Borger, the WA5CSF repeater (147.060, PL 00.0, node #387265) is also tied in to EchoLink and both can be accessed via RF.

What is EchoLink for iPhone?

EchoLink for iPhone is an edition of the EchoLink software that runs on an iPhone or iPod touch. If you own one of these devices and are a validated EchoLink user, you can access the EchoLink system from nearly anywhere where WiFi networking is available. If you have an iPhone, you can also use it to access EchoLink over the cellular data (3G or EDGE) network. EchoLink for iPhone is available free of charge from Apple’s App Store.

How do I access EchoLink from my Amateur Radio?

To access EchoLink via RF through a local repeater, you will need to know a few function commands that you will enter with DTMF tones from your radio station. You may not need to know all of the commands in the table below, but some of them will be necessary. Additionally, you will need to know the node number of the station that you want to connect to. A list of EchoLink active nodes that are available can be found here.

Command Description Default
Connect Connects to a station on the Internet, based on its node number. num
Connect by Call Connects to a station on the Internet, based on its callsign. C+call+#
Random Node Selects an available node (of any type) at random, and tries to connect to it. 00
Random Link Selects an available link or repeater (-L or -R) at random, and tries to connect to it. 01
Random Conf Selects a conference server at random, and tries to connect to it. 02
Random User Selects an available single-user station at random, and tries to connect to it. 03
RandomFavNode Selects an available node (of any type) at random from the Favorites List, and tries to connect to it. 001
RandomFavLink Selects an available link or repeater (-L or -R) at random from the Favorites List, and tries to connect to it. 011
RandomFavConf Selects a conference server at random from the Favorites List, and tries to connect to it. 021
RandomFavUser Selects an available single-user station at random, and tries to connect to it. 031
Disconnect Disconnects the station that is currently connected.  If more than one station is connected, disconnects only the most-recently-connected station. #
Disconnect All Disconnects all stations. ##
Reconnect Re-connects to the station that most recently disconnected. 09
Status Announces the callsign of each station currently connected. 08
Link Down Disables EchoLink (no connections can be established). (none)
Link Up Enables EchoLink. (none)
Play Info Plays a brief ID message. *
Query by Call Looks up a station by its callsign, and reads back its node number and status. 07+call+#
Query by Node Looks up a station by its node number, and reads back its callsign and status. 06+num
Profile Select Switches to a different stored set of configuration settings (0 through 9). B#

+num

Listen-Only On Inhibits transmission from RF to the Internet. 0511
Listen-Only Off Restores normal transmission from RF to the Internet. 0510

Connect

The default for the Connect command is to simply enter the 4- 5-, or 6-digit node number to which you wish to connect.  To prevent interference with other DTMF functions, however, you may wish to configure a special prefix, such as A or 99.

Link Up and Link Down

No defaults are provided for these functions.  To enable these functions, enter a DTMF sequence for each one, using the DTMF tab of the Sysop Settings page.

Profile Select

Profiles are numbered from 0 to one less than the number of profiles shown under File->Profiles.  Profile 0 is always MAIN.

Station Shortcuts 

Custom DTMF commands can be created to connect to specific stations. These commands are called Station Shortcuts, and are not shown in the table above. To manage your Station Shortcuts, click the Station Shortcuts button on the DTMF tab of Sysop Settings.

Entering Node Numbers

To enter a node number (for the Connect or Query by Node commands), enter the 4-, 5-, or 6-digit node number.  If the specified node is not among the stations currently logged on, EchoLink will say “NOT FOUND”.

Entering Callsigns

To enter a callsign (for the Connect by Call or Query by Call commands), press two digits for each letter and number in the callsign.  The first digit is the key on which the letter appears (using 1 for Q and Z), and the second digit is 1, 2, or 3, to indicate which letter is being entered.  To enter a digit, press the digit followed by 0.  When finished, end with the pound key (#).

For example, the letter “K” is entered as “52″, the letter “Q” is entered as “11″, and the digit “7″ is entered as “70″.

Callsigns need not be entered in full.  If a partial callsign is entered, EchoLink will find the first match among the stations currently logged on.  If no match is found among the stations currently logged on, EchoLink will say “NOT FOUND”.

Examples

(These examples assume that the default DTMF codes are configured.)

  • To connect to node number 9999:

Enter:  9 9 9 9

EchoLink responds with:

“CONNECTING TO CONFERENCE E-C-H-O-T-E-S-T”

followed by

“CONNECTED”

because 9999 is the node number of conference server “*ECHOTEST*”.

  • To get the status of K1RFD:

Enter:  0 7 5 2 1 0 7 2 3 3 3 1 #

EchoLink responds with:

“K-1-R-F-D 1-3-6-4-4 BUSY”

because 13644 is the node number of station K1RFD, and K1RFD is currently busy.

  • To connect to a random link or repeater:

Enter: 0 1

EchoLink responds with:

“CONNECTING TO K-1-O-F REPEATER”

followed by

“CONNECTED”

because K1OF-R was selected at random.

****************************************************************

Hopefully this information was useful. I hope to hear you soon on the weekly Ham Twit Net Thursdays at 01:00 UTC, (Wednesdays at 19:00 CST) which can be accessed via EchoLink node W5RAW-R #387265, or on the Borger repeater 147.060, PL 00.0. For more information on the HamTwitNet, click here.


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