Weather

SKYWARN ACTIVATION ALERT 6/6/2014

NWS AMA has requested SKYWARN activation at 3:00 PM today. NCS will be KE5ZRT, KF5TCY, & KD5ROK. All participating stations please check-in on any Caprock Intertie linked repeater system as you are available.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE SEVERE WEATHER THREAT VIDEO UPDATE FROM NWS AMA

CLICK HERE FOR THE CURRENT HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK

CLICK HERE TO RECEIVE SKYWARN ALERT MESSAGES TO YOUR CELL PHONE ***This, along with on-air notifications, is our official PARC ARES SKYWARN notification system.


AMA NWS Spotter Information Statement 4/22/14

STRONG TO SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS WILL BE POSSIBLE ACROSS MAINLY THE EASTERN HALF OF THE PANHANDLES WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON AND EVENING. DAMAGING WINDS TO 70 MPH AND HAIL UP TO BASEBALL SIZE WILL BE THE MAIN THREATS.

SPOTTER INFORMATION STATEMENT…

SPOTTERS AND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT OFFICIALS EAST OF A GUYMON TO AMARILLO LINE SHOULD CONTINUE TO MONITOR THE FORECAST FOR WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON AND EVENING… AND BE READY FOR SEVERE WEATHER OPERATIONS.

Click here for the full AMA NWS Hazardous Weather Outlook


Spotter Information Statement from NWS 4/18/14

THIS HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK IS FOR THE TEXAS AND OKLAHOMA
PANHANDLES.

.DAY ONE...TODAY AND TONIGHT.

NO HAZARDOUS WEATHER IS EXPECTED AT THIS TIME.

.DAYS TWO THROUGH SEVEN...SATURDAY THROUGH THURSDAY.

THUNDERSTORMS WILL BE POSSIBLE ACROSS MUCH OF THE OKLAHOMA AND TEXAS
PANHANDLES SATURDAY AND SUNDAY. ANY STORMS THAT DEVELOP ARE EXPECTED
TO REMAIN BELOW SEVERE LEVELS AT THIS TIME.

.SPOTTER INFORMATION STATEMENT...

SPOTTER ACTIVATION IS NOT ANTICIPATED AT THIS TIME.

$$

ANDRADE

 


2014 SKYWARN Storm Spotter Training

Krissy Scotten, Warning Coordination Meteorologist NWS AMA, will be presenting a SKYWARN certification class for the PARC ARES group on Tuesday February 11th at 19:30 at the AES Building located at 1900 Line Avenue in Amarillo, TX. This class will be open to the public. If you are unable to attend the SKYWARN Training scheduled for our ARES meeting, the 2014 Spotter Training Schedule is available here.

SKYWARN is the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) National Weather Service’s (NWS) severe weather spotting program with nearly 290,000 trained volunteers nationwide. Since the late 1960s, trained SKYWARN spotters have helped support the NWS’ primary mission of protecting life and property through the issuance of severe weather warnings. These dedicated citizens help keep their local community safe by conveying severe weather reports to their local NWS Forecast Office. SKYWARN spotters are integral to the success of our Nation’s severe weather warning system.

Every year the NWS conducts SKYWARN spotter training sessions. The NWS currently has 122 Weather Forecast Offices across the nation, each with a Warning Coordination Meteorologist, who is responsible for administering the SKYWARN program in their local area. There is no charge and a typical class takes about 2 hours to conduct.

Storm Spotter certification is required every two years, but please consider attending this class even if your certification has not expired. If you are not currently a SKYWARN spotter and you are interested in joining our volunteer group you are welcome to attend this training as well.

SKYWARN® is a registered trademark of NOAA’s National Weather Service.  Rules for the usage of the SKYWARN name and logo are available here.

For more information about SKYWARN, please click here.

If you are interested in joining ARES, please click here.

If you are interested in Amateur Radio, please click here.

 


Winter Survival Kit: 10 Things to Keep in Your Car

Remember the uncle you had that was always so prepared about everything? He was the guy who kept a perfect log of his vehicle maintenance in the glovebox. He knew who the most trustworthy mechanic in town was. He washed and waxed his own car. And, he had a survival kit in his trunk for winter and summer.

Winter is tough on vehicles and travel. Snow, cold temperatures, ice, slush and salt play havoc on a vehicle and our driving. The odds of us having a driving emergency is much greater in winter than in the other three seasons.

So, it pays to keep a kit in your trunk with all he things your are likely to need. Some auto parts stores and mass merchandisers like Walmart or Target sell these as a bundle in their own carrying case. But if you don’t find one that meets your price, and you want to combine new purchases with stuff you already have to save money, then here is your packing list. By the way, this makes a nice holiday gift for a loved on, but should be mandatory for the kid who is off to college with a car in a snow-belt school.

  • Blanket: If you are stuck with a car that won’t start, or that has conked out, and have to wait in cold weather for help, you will want a decent warm blanket as an extra layer.
  • Snow shovel: Get a short-handled shovel, probably a coal-type shovel, to stow in the trunk in case you need to remove snow from around the wheels of your vehicle. You can buy plastic ones, but you may want to opt for a metal one in case you also need to chip at some ice or compacted snow.
  • Flashlight: Self explanatory. Keep a good-sized, water-proof flashlight with fresh batteries in case your breakdown is at night. Pack emergency candles too, as a back-up.
  • Hand warmers: Available at camping stores. Smash the bag and the chemical reaction inside creates warmth to defrost fingers that may be trying to change a tire or fiddle with an engine.
  • Matches: You never know when you will have to manufacture heat. It’s better than rubbing tow cld, snowy sticks together, hoping for the best.
  • Bottle of water and a few protein, snack bars. You hear of people surviving on ketchup packets that have fallen between the seats, but some planning will yield a better menu under emergency conditions.
  • Syphon Pump: If being out of gas is your problem, and you get offered help by a good samaritan, you want t be able to get a gallon or two of gas out of another gas tank to get you going quickly.
  • Lightsticks: These cost almost nothing at a dollar store and can be used either as a iight source or to wear in case you are shoveling snow around your wheels at night.
  • Flares: These should be in your trunk in all seasons for putting next to your car if you are pulled over in distress.
  • Whistle: It can be used to either signal for help to someone who can’t hear you yell, or to scare someone who may be trying to take advantage of your distress.
  •  

    http://www.weather.com/life/safety/autosafety/article/winter-survival-kit_2011-10-30


    Spotter Activation May Be Necessary 9/5/12

    ISOLATED TO SCATTERED THUNDERSTORMS ARE EXPECTED TO DEVELOP THIS AFTERNOON AND THIS EVENING. THE MOST LIKELY LOCATION FOR THUNDERSTORMS WILL BE SOUTH AND EAST OF A DALHART TO GUYMON LINE. A FEW STORMS MAY BECOME STRONG TO SEVERE…WITH GUSTY WINDS TO 60 MPH AND HAIL TO THE SIZE OF QUARTERS THE PRIMARY HAZARDS. THE SEVERE WEATHER THREAT SHOULD DIMINISH BY MIDNIGHT TONIGHT.


    2012 PARC ARES SKYWARN Storm Spotter Training

    Krissy Scotten, Warning Coordination Meteorologist NWS AMA, will be presenting a SKYWARN certification class for the PARC ARES group on Tuesday March 13th 2012 at 19:30 at the AES Building located at 1900 Line Avenue in Amarillo, TX. This class will be open to the public. If you are unable to attend the SKYWARN Training scheduled for our ARES meeting, the 2012 Spotter Training Schedule is available here.

    SKYWARN is the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) National Weather Service’s (NWS) severe weather spotting program with nearly 290,000 trained volunteers nationwide. Since the late 1960s, trained SKYWARN spotters have helped support the NWS’ primary mission of protecting life and property through the issuance of severe weather warnings. These dedicated citizens help keep their local community safe by conveying severe weather reports to their local NWS Forecast Office. SKYWARN spotters are integral to the success of our Nation’s severe weather warning system.

    Every year the NWS conducts SKYWARN spotter training sessions. The NWS currently has 122 Weather Forecast Offices across the nation, each with a Warning Coordination Meteorologist, who is responsible for administering the SKYWARN program in their local area. There is no charge and a typical class takes about 2 hours to conduct.

    Storm Spotter certification is required every two years, but please consider attending this class even if your certification has not expired. If you are not currently a SKYWARN spotter and you are interested in joining our volunteer group you are welcome to attend this training as well.

    SKYWARN® is a registered trademark of NOAA’s National Weather Service.  Rules for the usage of the SKYWARN name and logo are available here.

    For more information about SKYWARN, please click here.

    If you are interested in joining ARES, please click here.

    If you are interested in Amateur Radio, please click here.


    Hazardous Weather Outlook

    STORM SPOTTERS AND WEATHER OBSERVERS ARE ENCOURAGED TO RELAY ANY SNOWFALL REPORTS TO THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN AMARILLO ON MONDAY AND TUESDAY.

    A STRONG STORM SYSTEM WILL BRING SIGNIFICANT ACCUMULATING SNOW TO THE TEXAS AND OKLAHOMA PANHANDLES MONDAY THROUGH TUESDAY MORNING. TOTAL SNOW ACCUMULATIONS ARE EXPECTED TO RANGE FROM 1 TO 3 INCHES ACROSS THE FAR SOUTHEAST TEXAS PANHANDLE TO 12 TO 15 INCHES ACROSS THE OKLAHOMA PANHANDLE AND THE NORTHERN TEXAS PANHANDLE.

    BLOWING AND DRIFTING SNOW ALONG WITH AREAS OF NEAR WHITEOUT AND NEAR BLIZZARD CONDITIONS CAN BE EXPECTED MONDAY THROUGH TUESDAY MORNING DUE TO NORTH WINDS OF 25 TO 35 MPH WITH HIGHER GUSTS. WIND CHILL VALUES ARE EXPECTED TO FALL INTO THE SINGLE DIGITS LATE MONDAY NIGHT AND TUESDAY MORNING ACROSS ALL OF THE OKLAHOMA PANHANDLE AND MOST OF THE TEXAS PANHANDLE.

    A BLIZZARD WATCH IS IN EFFECT FOR ALL OF THE OKLAHOMA PANHANDLE…AS WELL AS FOR NORTHERN…WESTERN…CENTRAL AND SOUTHWESTERN PARTS OF THE TEXAS PANHANDLE FOR MONDAY THROUGH TUESDAY MORNING. A WINTER STORM WATCH IS IN EFFECT FOR MONDAY THROUGH TUESDAY MORNING FOR REMAINING SECTIONS OF THE TEXAS PANHANDLE EXCEPT FOR THE FAR SOUTHEAST PART.

     


    Before Winter Storms and Extreme Cold

    Add the following supplies to your disaster supplies kit:

    • Rock salt to melt ice on walkways
    • Sand to improve traction
    • Snow shovels and other snow removal equipment.

    Prepare your home and family

    • Prepare for possible isolation in your home by having sufficient heating fuel; regular fuel sources may be cut off. For example, store a good supply of dry, seasoned wood for your fireplace or wood-burning stove.
    • Winterize your home to extend the life of your fuel supply by insulating walls and attics, caulking and weather-stripping doors and windows, and installing storm windows or covering windows with plastic.
    • Winterize your house, barn, shed or any other structure that may provide shelter for your family, neighbors, livestock or equipment. Clear rain gutters; repair roof leaks and cut away tree branches that could fall on a house or other structure during a storm.
    • Insulate pipes with insulation or newspapers and plastic and allow faucets to drip a little during cold weather to avoid freezing.
    • Keep fire extinguishers on hand, and make sure everyone in your house knows how to use them. House fires pose an additional risk, as more people turn to alternate heating sources without taking the necessary safety precautions.
    • Learn how to shut off water valves (in case a pipe bursts).
    • Know ahead of time what you should do to help elderly or disabled friends, neighbors or employees.
    • Hire a contractor to check the structural ability of the roof to sustain unusually heavy weight from the accumulation of snow – or water, if drains on flat roofs do not work.

    Prepare your car

    • Check or have a mechanic check the following items on your car:
      • Antifreeze levels – ensure they are sufficient to avoid freezing.
      • Battery and ignition system – should be in top condition and battery terminals should be clean.
      • Brakes – check for wear and fluid levels.
      • Exhaust system – check for leaks and crimped pipes andrepair or replace as necessary. Carbon monoxide is deadly and usually gives no warning.
      • Fuel and air filters – replace and keep water out of the system by using additives and maintaining a full tank of gas.
      • Heater and defroster – ensure they work properly.
      • Lights and flashing hazard lights – check for serviceability.
      • Oil – check for level and weight. Heavier oils congeal more at low temperatures and do not lubricate as well.
      • Thermostat – ensure it works properly.
      • Windshield wiper equipment – repair any problems and maintain proper washer fluid level.
    • Install good winter tires.Make sure the tires have adequate tread. All-weather radials are usually adequate for most winter conditions. However, some jurisdictions require that to drive on their roads, vehicles must be equipped with chains or snow tires with studs.
    • Maintain at least a half tank of gas during the winter season.
    • Place a winter emergency kit in each car that includes:
      • a shovel
      • windshield scraper and small broom
      • flashlight
      • battery powered radio
      • extra batteries
      • water
      • snack food
      • matches
      • extra hats, socks and mittens
      • First aid kit with pocket knife
      • Necessary medications
      • blanket(s)
      • tow chain or rope
      • road salt and sand
      • booster cables
      • emergency flares
      • fluorescent distress flag

    Dress for the Weather

    • Wear several layers of loose fitting, lightweight, warm clothing rather than one layer of heavy clothing. The outer garments should be tightly woven and water repellent.
    • Wear mittens, which are warmer than gloves.
    • Wear a hat.
    • Cover your mouth with a scarf to protect your lungs.

    For more information:

    http://www.fema.gov/hazard/winter/wi_before.shtm

     


    2011 SEVERE WEATHER CONFERENCE, Amarillo

    Amarillo Civic Center March 19, 2011

    Booths: 9AM-12:30PM

    General Session: 12:30PM-4PM

    Spotter Training: 4:30PM-6:30PM


    Storm Reports via Twitter

     You can now submit your significant weather observations to the National Weather Service (NWS) via Twitter.

    Everyone talks about the weather.  Now’s your chance to “tweet” it and be heard.  Through an experimental program, the National Weather Service will be searching for tweets that contain significant weather information.

    Why Twitter?

    An advantage of searching Twitter for weather reports is the capability to utilize recently added “geotagging” — geographical information that is associated with something, in this case individual Tweets.  This allows the NWS to correlate each Tweet to its location when it was sent.  This capability will help to enhance and increase timely and accurate online weather reporting and communication between the public and their local weather forecast offices.  The reports will be carefully evaluated during the experiment to ensure quality and timeliness.

    Who Can Participate?

    Anyone with a Twitter account can participate.  Note: Trained storm spotters should use pre-established communication methods (Amateur Radio, toll-free line, eSpotter, etc.), when possible, to send severe weather reports to the NWS–although Twitter reports (photos) may be useful in addition to pre-established methods.

    Here’s What You Need to Do:

    If Geotagging is available on your 3rd party Twitter application:

    1. Make sure geotagging is turned on for your 3rd party Twitter app.
    2. Make sure geotagging is turned on for your Twitter account page.
    3. Submit your Tweet report via your 3rd party app in the following format:
      #wxreport your significant weather report

    Some examples of weather report tweets with geotagging:

    Ex. 1:   #wxreport 6.0″ of new snow as of 1 pm
    Ex. 2:   #wxreport Hail 3/4 inch in diameter at 4:25 pm

    If Geotagging is NOT available on your 3rd party Twitter application (or you want to use the web-based Twitter.com):

    1. Log into your Twitter account via the web or mobile device.
    2. Submit your tweet report in the following format:
      #wxreport  WW  your location WW  your significant weather report
    3. Your location can be just about anything, but the more specific the better.  Here are some examples listed from most accurate to least accurate location identification:
      • Most accurate–A latitude and longitude:
        WW 44.231, -88.485 WW
      • An address:
        WW 2485 S Point Rd, Green Bay, WI 54313 WW
      • A street intersection:
        WW intersection of Holly St and N 4th St, Perry, OK WW
      • A city name:
        WW Ft Lauderdale, FL WW
      • Least accurate–A zip code:
        WW 53221 WW

    Some examples of weather report tweets without geotagging:

    Ex. 1:   #wxreport WW 1289 W Oakridge Circle, St Louis, MO WW 6.0″ new snow as of 1 pm
    Ex. 2:   #wxreport WW 44.115, -88.595 WW Hail 3/4 inch in diameter at 4:25 pm

    What You Can Report

    You can tweet any weather event that occurs in your local area, but we are most interested in significant events: snowfall, severe weather, flooding, etc.  In particular:

    • Damage from winds–briefly describe what was damaged and time it occurred.
    • Hail–include size of hail and time it fell.
    • Tornadoes or funnel clouds.
    • Flooding–briefly describe what is occurring.
    • Snowfall during an event and storm total.  When reporting snowfall, include the time period when it fell.
    • Freezing rain or freezing drizzle producing a ‘glaze’ on objects or roads.
    • Dense fog restricting visibility to less than a half mile.

    Additional Guidance

    Frequently Asked Questions

    • The purpose of this project is to allow people to submit reports.  Please be responsible and respectful of the purpose.
    • Be as specific as possible when describing the weather report.
    • A valid Twitter user account is required to submit reports.  As such, use of this service constitutes an agreement to the terms of service of the provider. Go to: http://twitter.com/tos for more information
    • Interested in displaying tweets from the project on your own web page? The files you need are contained here (zip). See the “readme.txt” file included for more information.

    Monitoring Your Reports

    The following external (non-NWS) links will monitor #wxreport tweets (click the links below):

    Note: Some #wxreport monitoring websites that plot the weather report on a map may not properly plot tweets that use the “WW” location tag.

    If you have any questions or suggestions for the program, please contact Corey Pieper — corey.pieper@noaa.gov


    Winter Weather Preparedness

    With winter weather in the forecast, it seems as though this would be a good time for a reminder of a few simple safety tips that could save a life. Dress for the Season Wear loose, lightweight, warm clothes in layers. Trapped air insulates. Remove layers to avoid perspiration and subsequent chill. Outer garments should be tightly woven, water repellent, and hooded. Wear a hat. Half your body heat loss can be from the head. Cover your mouth to protect your lungs from extreme cold. Mittens, snug at the wrist, are better than gloves. Try to stay dry.

    In Vehicles:

    Plan your travel and check the latest weather reports to avoid the storm! Fully check and winterize your vehicle before the winter season begins.

    Road Conditions Hotlines:

    Texas Panhandle 1-806-468-1488
    Texas 1-800-452-9292
    Oklahoma 1-405-425-2385
    New Mexico 1-800-432-4269
    Colorado 1-303-639-1111
    Kansas 1-800-585-7623

    For Current Weather Conditions and Forecast: http://www.srh.noaa.gov/ama/

    Carry a Winter Storm Survival Kit:

    • Mobile phone, charger, batteries
    • Blankets/sleeping bags
    • Flashlight with extra batteries
    • First-aid kit
    • Knife
    • High-calorie, non-perishable food
    • Extra clothing to keep dry
    • Large empty can to use as emergency toilet. Tissues and paper towels for sanitary purposes
    • Small can and waterproof matches to melt snow for drinking water
    • Sack of sand or cat litter for traction
    • Shovel
    • Windshield scraper and brush
    • Tool kit
    • Tow rope
    • Battery booster cables
    • Water container
    • Compass and road maps.
    • Keep your gas tank near full to avoid ice in the tank and fuel lines.
    • Avoid traveling alone.
    • Let someone know your timetable and primary and alternate routes.

    At Home and Work

    Primary concerns are loss of heat, power and telephone service and a shortage of supplies if storm conditions continue for more than a day.

    Have available:

    • Flashlight and extra batteries.
    • Battery-powered NOAA Weather
    • Radio and portable radio to receive emergency information. These may be your only links to the outside.
    • Extra food and water. Have high energy food, such as dried fruit, nuts and granola bars, and food requiring no cooking or refrigeration.
    • Extra medicine and baby items.
    • First-aid supplies.
    • Heating fuel. Refuel before you are empty. Fuel carriers may not reach you for days after a winter storm.
    • Emergency heat source: fireplace, wood stove, space heater. Use properly to prevent a fire. Ventilate properly.
    • Fire extinguisher, smoke alarm. Test smoke alarms once a month to ensure they work properly.
    • Make sure pets have plenty of food, water and shelter.

    On the Farm/Pets

    • Move animals to sheltered areas.
    • Shelter belts, properly laid out and oriented, are better protection for cattle than confining shelters, such
      as sheds.
    • Haul extra feed to nearby feeding areas.
    • Have water available. Most animals die from dehydration in winter storms.
    • Make sure pets have plenty of food, water and shelter.

     

    For more information, please visit http://www.srh.noaa.gov/images/ama/prepared/winterstorm.pdf


    2011 National Severe Weather Workshop

    March 3 – 5, 2011

    Norman Oklahoma

    Please join us in Norman for a unique and growing workshop focused on hazardous weather information-sharing, and discussions on the effective transmission of messages about meteorological risk. Emergency managers, weather enthusiasts, teachers, students, meteorologists, broadcasters, and vendors in threat alerting, sheltering, and communications will gather, present, and discuss inter-related topics about weather hazards in early March. Some of the subjects that will be highlighted during the 2011 National Severe Weather Workshop include:

    • Impacts of Hazardous Weather Events: Response and Recovery
    • The Role of Law Enforcement in Weather Emergencies
    • Progress in Prediction Technologies
    • Siren Policy
    • National Weather Service Products, Services, and Outreach
    • Weather Radar Technology Updates and Training
    • Media Relations
    • Psychological Impacts and Issues of Significant Weather Events
    • Weather Trade and Technology Expo

    More information at: http://www.norman.noaa.gov/nsww/


    Current Weather

     

    This radar image is provided by the National Weather Service

     


  • Register Here to Receive ARES RACES & SKYWARN Alert Messages to Your Personal Cell Phone

    Phone number

    Carrier

    Include Area Code *Standard text messaging rates may apply from your carrier*
  • Click here to follow Panhandle ARES on Twitter!

    Follow PanhandleARES on Twitter
  • Upcoming Events

    Loading...
  • Bike MS 2012

    Loading...
  • PARC Field Day 2012

    Loading...
  • SKYWARN Recognition Day 2011

    Loading...
  • Spook-O-Ree 2011

    Loading...
  • Tour D’ Cotton

    Loading...
  • 2011 Tri-State Fair Parade

    Loading...
  • 2011 W5WX Field Day

    Loading...
  • RSS Spotter Network Reports

  • PARC ARES on Twitter

  • RSS ARRL News

    • Internet Access to ARRL Headquarters to be Disrupted on August 22
      Internet access to ARRL Headquarters in Newington, Connecticut, will be disrupted for up to 6 hours on Tuesday, August 22 (0400-1000 UTC). Affected systems include, but are not necessarily limited to e-mail, bulk mail, reflectors, Logbook of The World (LoTW), DXCC, National Parks on the Air (NPOTA), and the ARRL Development page.The outage is necessary […]
    • The K7RA Solar Update
      Several readers pointed out those averages for the various indicators we track were all wrong last week. Average daily sunspot number was 12.1 instead of 5, although the rest of the text in the bulletin was correct. Likewise, average daily solar flux was 73.2 instead of 71.And average daily planetary A index was 11.3 instead […]
    • ARRL Audio News Announces New Extra Edition Service
      ARRL Audio News is proud to announce the debut of our Extra Edition service. Extra Editions are longer, uninterrupted audio segments devoted to particular topics. They will be posted on the ARRL Audio News web page. Just go to the page and then scroll down to Audio News Extra Edition. The Extra Edition will also […]
    • High-Speed Telegraphy Competition Set for September 8-12 in Hungary
      The 14th High-Speed Telegraphy (HST) World Championship will take place September 8-12 in Esztergom, Hungary. The event’s date was shifted this year to avoid conflicting with the International Amateur Radio Union Region 1 (IARU-R1) General Conference.The Hungarian Radio Amateur Society (MRASZ) is organizing the 2017 HST, which is sponsored by IARU. Hungary was the site […]
    • Cosmonauts Manually Deploy Three Nanosatellites with Amateur Radio Payloads
  • Copyright © 1996-2010 PanhandleARES.org. All rights reserved.
    iDream theme by Templates Next | Powered by WordPress